A multi-disciplinary designer’s journey in field recording, sound design, and music.

Deer Antlers as Instrument

Posted: December 15th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: found sound objects, music, sound design

aantlers

Most years I host a “white elephant” party: Bring gifts you were given that are pretty bad, re-wrap them, and then you pick from the pile and laugh at the bizarre stuff you unwrap. Last year, I wound up with a pair of deer antlers.

I don’t hunt, yet I have a thing for taxidermy. I have no idea why.

As they sat in my studio, I thought back to an interview I did with Cheryl Leonard for the Sonic Terrain blog a few years ago. I remember her making instruments from limpet shells and other organic objects. Why was I not exploring the sonic possibilities of this strange object on my shelf?

Deer antlers are bone, not hair, so they are riddled with hollow channels, and are extremely tough. The main thing I tried was to explore their resonance, with a cello bow. I had to lay a good amount of rosin on the bow, but they did resonate. The sound is hissy, atonal, but with some pronounced fundamentals and overtones…just not in relationships that one usually considers musical. I used a Barcus Berry 4000 contact microphone and recorded onto a Sound Devices 702 field recorder.

When I hear an interesting sustained sound with too many frequencies, or odd frequency relationships, I usually go to one place to create something musical out of it: iZotope Iris. It’s a very creative tool for making playable virtual instruments out of pretty much any sound. In this case I also used New Sonic Arts’ Granite granular synthesis plugin for several layers. It all sounded very breath-y, like a somewhat melodic whisper. I mixed it with some LFO-driven rhythms in Reason and a bassline and drone from Madrona Labs’ Aalto. It was all put together in Logic Pro X with very few effects, lightly compressed by Cytomic’s The Glue.

Deer antlers, even processed through modern software, aren’t the most flexible or sonically soothing instruments around, but this article can at least serve as a reminder to explore everything around us for its interesting sonic possibilities. You never know what you’ll find.

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Automatonomous

Posted: November 4th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: music
Ramshackle, loose, clattering.

Ramshackle, loose, clattering.

This clacky, rickety ambient music track is made almost entirely from guitar sounds, primarily extended techniques, but far more melodic and structured rhythmic than work shared previously. Clearly enhanced with effects in the edit, and some percussive effects from zithers and accordions that kick in around 0:50 from Echo Collective.

It felt windswept, remote, and forlorn, so I chose this photo from the California ghost town of Bodie to accompany it. Enjoy.

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Indian Summer

Posted: May 27th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: music

No sound effects or field recordings this time, instead…a short sample of music, improvised on a sweltering fall day that inspired the track’s name.

This piece is entirely played on the guitar, obviously run through effects in places and totally unprocessed in others. Some of the many guitar tracks were also prepared with magnets on the strings, pennies stuck in the fretboard, and I think an elastic band.

You don’t have to ask: Yes, I listen to Klimek and Fennesz. :-)


[Epiphone "Les Paul"-clone guitar into MOTU 828mkII interface, recorded and processed in Apple Logic Pro]

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